Image description

Pablo Picasso - Corrida: Torrero Blesse

Pablo Picasso Corrida: Torrero Blesse

Taureau et chevaux dans l’arène

Bullfight: Wounded Torero

Original Etching, Paris, 7th November 1933 , on small Montval Fillegree paper,  with Vollard watermark signature, signed by the artist in pencil, 

Edition: 260 

Literature: 

Brigit Baer “Picasso Peintre-Graveur” Volume II - Page 224, Number 380

George Bloch: Catalogue de l’oeuvre grave et lithographie - Number 203

Bolliger, Hans & Bernheim Geiser “Picasso’s Vollard Suite

Mallen, Enrique Online Picasso Project: Number 33.043

Published by: Ambroise Vollard, Paris

Printed by: Lacouriere in 1939

Size: 44.5 x 34 (paper size) ; 193 x 268 mms (plate size)

Provenance: Sold in 1938 through The Bragaglia Galerie, Rome to collector Arturo Tonnarelli Gracetti, and thence by family descent to his Grandson.

Public Collections:

British Museum, London. The Museum recently acquired a complete series of the Vollard Suite which includes this work. They were all on public display in 2012 in the Department of prints and drawings

MOMA , New York https://www.moma.org/collection/works/64972?locale=en

Note: The publication of the hundred etchings created by Picasso between 1930 and 1937 was one of Ambroise Vollard's most impressive undertakings. Vollard was one of the greatest art dealers and publishers of his time and his championship of some of the most celebrated artists of the day deserves the thanks of later generations. His artists, to name but a few, included Cezanne, Renoir, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Rousseau, Rouault and Picasso. Picasso met Vollard in Paris in 1901 and worked with him over an extended period. When the Vollard Suite etchings were first made they were in fact rarely signed (with the exception of some rare proofs made on vellum in editions of 3). Vollard died tragically in a car accident in 1939 and eventually, after the Second World War, most of the Vollard Suite passed into the hands of the famous Dealer Petiet. Petiet knew that Picasso , would never sign anything until he was paid for it and the artist required a substantial fee for putting his signature on the Vollard Suite etchings. Accordingly Petiet gave his buyers the option of buying them either unsigned or, for 10% more on the cost, signed. This meant that Picasso signatures from 1939 until the artists death appear on Vollard Suite etchings. Obviously there is a difference in the artists signature as he aged.